quarantine project workouts

CTS Quarantine Project Daily Workouts

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“Endurance athletes are used to taking the long route, and with the accelerating COVID19 crisis we are all facing the most important endurance challenge of our lives. Like all endurance events, this one will have highs and lows, unforeseen challenges, opportunities to work together, and there will be a finish line. How long it takes to get there depends a lot on the choices we make as individuals, communities, and countries. We each play a role in determining our shared future, so my team and I created The CTS Quarantine Project as an effort to use our skills and resources to help people through a challenging time.” – Chris Carmichael, Founder and Head Coach of CTS

CTS Quarantine Project Daily Workouts

Introduction:
As the effort to reduce transmission of COVID19 starts to swiftly constrain outdoor training and events, endurance athletes are having to adapt to the reality we might be primarily training indoors through much of the spring. We know everyone has different goals, time limitations, available equipment, and priorities, so the CTS Coaching Staff is working together to create daily workouts for anyone to access.

Throughout the crisis, we are going to provide a series of daily workouts that feature intervals or activities that will support your fitness and aerobic conditioning. There will be cycling, running, and strength/stretching workouts available. The cycling workouts will be about 60-75 minutes long and available as text or downloadable files in .zwo, .erg, .mrc, and .fit formats.

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The workouts in this series are designed to be stand-alone sessions, not a progressive training plan. If you are following a structured plan through this time period, they can be an alternative workout if you want something different. If you are exercising on your own, we encourage you to train 3-5 times a week and integrate workouts you find interesting.

The cycling workouts will follow a weekly pattern so harder sessions alternate with more moderate efforts. That way, if you do happen to complete several days in a row, they won’t all be hard interval sessions. Not only would that bad for your training, we want to encourage you to work hard enough to maintain or improve fitness, but not so hard that you get run down. The order you will see with the cycling workouts is:

Monday: Strength/Stretching
Tuesday: High intensity intervals
Wednesday: Strength/Stretching
Thursday: Climbing/Threshold/FTP
Friday: Aerobic/Drills
Saturday: High intensity intervals
Sunday: Endurance


The Workouts

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Cycling: Ramps and Surges (1:15:00)

Warm up with easy EM, then it’s a rolling ramp to LT twice before some true recovery, then on to the final sets of Tempo with surges.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. Ramp up in 4 steps
    1. 3 min @ 55-65 % of FTP
    2. 3 min @ 65-75 % of FTP
    3. 3 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
    4. 3 min @ 85-95 % of FTP
  3. Ramp up in 4 steps
    1. 3 min @ 55-65 % of FTP
    2. 3 min @ 65-75 % of FTP
    3. 3 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
    4. 3 min @ 85-95 % of FTP
  4. Recovery: 5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  5. Tempo with Surges (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Tempo: 3 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
    2. Hard Surge: 15 sec @ 150-160 % of FTP
  6. Recovery: 5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  7. Tempo with Surges (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Tempo: 3 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
    2. Hard Surge: 15 sec @ 150-160 % of FTP
  8. Cool Down: 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: 30/20/10 x3 (Total time: 00:50:00)

After your warm up, you will cycle though intervals at easy, moderate, and hard efforts. Check in with your effort using Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) cues below. Pay attention to how you are breathing to make sure you are making a distinction between the different paces.

Easy: RPE 4. Recovery effort, comfortable breathing. You could tell a great story here.

Moderate: RPE 6-7. Endurance to high end aerobic effort, moderate to deep breathing. Comfortable to short conversation 2-3 sentences.

Hard: RPE: 8-10. Lactate threshold to VO2max effort, deep and labored/rapid breathing. Short sentences to short words.

Instructions:

  1. Warm up
    1. 20 min @ 4 RPE
  2. Interval Set
    1. Set 1 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recovery
      1. 2 min @ 4 RPE
    3. Set 2 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    4. Recovery
      1. 2 min @ 4 RPE
    5. Set 3 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
  3. Easy Pace
    1. 17 min @ 4-5 RPE

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Cycling: Pursuiter Intervals 4x5min with 4min RBI

These Pursuiter Intervals will work on your starting and finishing power with FTP work between.
Warm up and do openers, then proceed with these new intervals like this:
30s @ PI
2min @ SS
2min @ CR
30s @ PI
Recover with 4-5min RBI, then go again.

Finish up with easy EM and a proper cool down.

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 60 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. PowerIntervals (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Hard: 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1:30 @ 45 % of FTP
  3. Easy Endurance Miles
    1. 4 min @ 65 % of FTP
  4. Pursuiter Intervals (Repeat 4 Times)
    1. Ramp up in 4 steps
      1. PI: 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
      2. SS: 2 min @ 94 % of FTP
      3. CR: 2 min @ 107 % of FTP
      4. PI: 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 4 min @ 45 % of FTP
  5. Easy EM
    1. 15 min @ 75 % of FTP
  6. Cool Down
    1. 4 min @ 40 % of FTP

Running: VO2 max Run Intervals (4x3min, 3min recovery)

Your VO2max represents the maximum volume of oxygen that your body can take in and us in an all-out effort.

Even though these Running Intervals are at done at an RPE of 10, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the full 3 minutes.

At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals.

Best to do these on a hill (to help you you maintain a consistent effort).  Pace isn’t the goal here- it is the intensity that is the goal! If you have to do this on a treadmill, you might be reach the intensity best at a 2% incline.

Check in with yourself and do a talk test. Your breathing will be short and fast, with the ability to only say a short word before you need to take the next breath.

Instructions:

  1. Warmup: 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Strides (repeat 5 times)
    1. 20 sec @ 9-10 RPE
    2. 1 min Easy 5-7 RPE
  3. VO2 max Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. 3 min @ 10 RPE (Accelerate over 15-20 sec to the pace you can sustain for the interval.)
    2. 3 min Easy @ 4 RPE
  4. Cooldown: 14:20 @ 5 RPE

Monday, April 27, 2020

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Driveway Drill from coach @iamjoshwhitmore for the CTS Quarantine Project: Ride Down Drops Skill Level: Beginner to Intermediate Bike: Any Why is this important? Performing these skills keeps you from going over the bars when riding off a drop. It also helps you stay in control by intentionally guiding the front wheel to the landing rather than just riding off and reacting to whatever happens. Prerequisite – Master the April 3rd “Neutral” and “Ready” Body Position Drills How to do it: 🎯 Approach the drop in Neutral Position, a high body position will allow you to see more of the landing past the lip. 🎯 Move to the Ready Position just before the lip. Getting lower allows for more range of motion for the push step and makes for better stability overall. 🎯 Push the front wheel forward as you go over the lip. Guide the front wheel to an intentional landing. This gets the bike farther out in front of you to avoid the endo. Note: This is a “nose in” technique where there is no danger of the chainring hitting the lip and the front wheel touches down first. We’ll cover a more advanced technique of a level landing off a higher drop in a future drill. Practice: 🎯 Start with practicing the three steps just riding along with no drop at all 🎯 Progress to timing the steps for a drop and work your way up to higher drops slowly 🎯 Experiment with lower Ready position and a more aggressive Push #mtbskillswithjosh #ctsquarantineproject ⁣#mtbskills #techtips #coachlife #mountainbike #ctsathlete #certifiedinstructor #pmbia #seekqualifiedinstruction #mtbskillscoaching

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Saturday, April 25, 2020

Cycling: Tempo w/ PI Accelerations – 2x12min with 4min RBI

Warm up and build into the longer fast pedals today. Then jump into tempos with longer power interval sections. These are great for replicating group riding and racing. The pace is high but there are surges and pace lining to keep the effort inconsistent.

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 65 % of FTP
  2. Endurance Miles: 5 min @ 78 % of FTP
  3. FastPedal (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Fast Pedal: 2 min @ 87 % of FTP, 100-120 rpm
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 55 % of FTP
  4. Tempo with PowerInterval Surges (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Tempo: 2 min @ 90 % of FTP
    2. PI: 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 30 sec @ 55 % of FTP
  5. Recovery: 4 min @ 55 % of FTP
  6. Tempo with PowerInterval Surges (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Tempo: 2 min @ 90 % of FTP
    2. PI: 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 30 sec @ 55 % of FTP
  7. Recovery: 4 min @ 55 % of FTP
  8. Endurance Miles: 12 min @ 80 % of FTP
  9. Cool Down: 7 min @ 55 % of FTP

Running: Speed Play 8 x 1min TempoRun (1:00:00)

Just what it says in the title… today you play around with speed. After your warmup, you will cycle through some hard intervals at the upper end of your threshold pace. These are not VO2 intervals! If you try doing these at an RPE 10, you will fade out quickly. You have extra time to recover between so the intervals so that you can put in a consistent effort with each one. RPE of 9 is at the upper end of a 10K race pace, but it’s not your maxed out pace.

  1. Warm up: 20 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Speed Play Intervals (Repeat 8 times)
    1. Hard: 1 min @ 9 RPE
    2. Easy: 2 min @ 3-5 RPE
  3. Cool Down: 16 min @ 3-5 RPE

Friday, April 24, 2020

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Today’s Driveway Drill for the CTS Quarantine Project: Downhill Switchbacks⁣ ⁣ Bike: MTB⁣ ⁣ Skill Level: Everyone ⁣ ⁣ Why is this important? Here in Pisgah National Forest, right out the back door of our CTS Brevard training center, we have tons of tight downhill switchbacks (180 degree turns, super tight, often off-camber, no berm, steep downhill). You’ve got to do everything JUST RIGHT to stay on the bike. ⁣ ⁣ How to do it: Push, Rotate, Balance⁣ ⁣ Prerequisite – Go back to previous Driveway Drill editions for slow tight turns on flat ground. Figure-8s, outside foot forward, ratcheting. Get all of that DIALED. ⁣ ⁣ Set up: Do this on a side-hill. Ride across the hill maintaining elevation, then turn downhill as tight as possible and exit in the opposite direction. ⁣ ⁣ 🎯 Approach in a Standing Neutral Position – level pedals, chin over stem, arms/legs slightly bent. ⁣ 🎯 PUSH your handlebar farther out in front of you. You’re getting ready to go down something steep, so you have to get that front wheel way out front. ⁣ 🎯 ROTATE your body as much as possible. Turn head and look where you are going, hips rotated into the turn. Bend your knees a bit more and swing that butt to the outside to get more rotation. ⁣ 🎯 BALANCE through the 2nd half of the turn. Guide the front wheel on the smoothest path. This is where all your slow speed balance drills will shine! ⁣ ⁣ #mtbskillswithjosh #ctsquarantineproject ⁣#mtbskills #techtips #coachlife #mountainbike #ctsathlete #certifiedinstructor #pmbia #seekqualifiedinstruction #mtbskillscoaching

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Thursday, April 23, 2020

OverUnder Intervals are a great way to develop the “agility” to handle changes in pace during hard, sustained efforts. Earlier, there was an OverUnder Interval workout in the Quarantine Project with the “Under” intensity at SS range, and the “Over” intensity at CR range. This week’s version is a High Intensity OverUnder because the “Over” periods are at PowerInterval intensity (110-125% of FTP). The “Under” periods are less intense than last week. In this version, they are at SteadyState intensity (95-100% of FTP). During the 10-minute interval you will alternate between these two intensity levels. The harder surges within the interval generate more lactate in your muscles, and then you force your body to process this lactate while you’re still riding at a relatively high intensity. This workout can be performed indoors on a trainer or outside on a flat road, rolling hills, or a sustained climb that’s relatively gradual (3 to 6 percent grade). It is difficult to accomplish this workout on a steep climb, because the pitch often makes it difficult to control your effort level. Your gearing should be moderate, and pedal cadence should be high (100 rpm or higher) if you’re riding on flat ground or small rollers. Pedal cadence should be above 85 rpm if you’re completing the intervals on a gradual climb.

To complete the interval, bring your intensity up to your SteadyState range during the first 45 to 60 seconds. Maintain this heart rate intensity for the prescribed Under time and then increase your intensity to your Over intensity for the prescribed time. At the end of this Over time, return to your Under intensity range and continue riding at this level of effort until it’s once again time to return to your Over intensity. Continue alternating this way until the end of the interval. OverUnder Intervals always end with a period at Over intensity. This workout builds up high levels of lactic acid. Working in this way trains your body to dissipate and buffer lactate, also known as increasing your lactate tolerance. Recovery periods between intervals are typically about half the length of the work interval.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 85 % of FTP
    3. Warm up: 4 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 90 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 100 % of FTP
    5. Warm up: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. Openers (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Hard: 30 sec @ 140 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1:30 @ 45 % of FTP
  3. Recovery: 1:30 @ 45 % of FTP
  4. OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. SteadyState: 2 min @ 96 % of FTP
    2. PowerInterval: 30 sec @ 120 % of FTP
  5. Recovery: 4 min @ 50 % of FTP
  6. OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. SteadyState: 2 min @ 96 % of FTP
    2. PowerInterval: 30 sec @ 120 % of FTP
  7. Recovery: 4 min @ 50 % of FTP
  8. OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. SteadyState: 2 min @ 96 % of FTP
    2. PowerInterval: 30 sec @ 120 % of FTP
  9. Cool Down – Easy EM: 9:30 @ 55 % of FTP

Running: EKG Workout (1:00:00)

The EKG Workout is designed to cycle through intervals at your endurance, tempo and running interval (VO2max) intensities. You have been doing a variety of workouts at different effort levels. This one will help you to feel the differences between what is comfortable, moderate, and hard.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 3-5 RPE
  2. Comfortable (Endurance effort): 3 min @ 5-6 RPE
  3. Moderate (Tempo effort): 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
  4. Hard (VO2 effort): 1 min @ 10 RPE
  5. Moderate (Tempo effort): 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
  6. Hard (VO2 effort): 1 min @ 10 RPE
  7. Recovery: 3 min @ 3-5 RPE
  8. Comfortable (Endurance effort): 4 min @ 5-6 RPE
  9. Moderate (Tempo effort): 2 min @ 8-9 RPE
  10. Hard (VO2 effort): 30 sec @ 10 RPE
  11. Moderate (Tempo effort): 2 min @ 8-9 RPE
  12. Recovery/Cool Down: 20:30 @ 3-5 RPE

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Cycling: Power Interval Ladder (1:15:00)

Power intervals are maximal efforts that should be performed at a 10/10 on the RPE
scale. The goal of power intervals is to increase your maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) and subsequently raise your ceiling of performance to allow for more growth as far as your sustainable power at lactate threshold. Power intervals should be approached in a “peak and fade” style. This means you attack at the beginning of the interval; accelerate hard to get to maximum effort/power/pace as quickly as you can. Because of the intensity of this acceleration, you will almost certainly slow down and/or see a decline in power output from about 30 seconds in all the way to the end of the interval. You generate a tremendous amount of lactate with your initial acceleration, and you’re riding through that lactate accumulation for the rest of the interval as your aerobic system tries to “catch up”. Keep your cadence above 100rpm for the entire interval. Recovery between intervals is purposely short, just three minutes. You’ll start the next interval before you feel fully recovered, especially toward the end of the set.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 60 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. Power Interval (Repeat 2 Times)
    1. 3 min @ 130 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  3. Power Interval (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 2 min @ 130 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 2 min @ 55 % of FTP
  4. Power Interval (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 1 min @ 130 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 2 min @ 55 % of FTP
  5. Cool Down: 10 min @ 40 % of FTP

Running: 5 x 4 TempoRun (1:00:00)

Running at your lactate threshold helps your body to better use and process lactate so that you can run harder for longer.  Since your Tempo effort is at RPE 8-9, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the duration. At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals. Ease into your Tempo interval and it should feel like a 10K race pace- comfortably hard. Check in with yourself and do a talk test. You should be able to say 3-4 words (but not be reduced to only a 4-letter word!)

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Repeat 5 times
    1. Strides: 20 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recover: 1 min @ 5-7 RPE
  3. Tempo Run Interval (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Tempo effort: 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
    2. Recovery Effort: 2 min @ 4-5 RPE
  4. Cool Down: 13:20 @ 3-5 RPE

Monday, April 21, 2020


Saturday, April 18, 2020

Cycling: Speed Intervals – 3x8min as 20s “On” 40s “Off” with 5min RBI

Perform these on flat and consistent terrain or on the trainer. The gearing should be moderate but pedal cadence must be high 110 or higher. Speed, power and acceleration are the key elements, not heart rate. This workout builds up high levels of lactic acid. It develops lactate tolerance to train your body to dissipate and process lactate. If you have to, shift into a lighter gear to maintain the cadence, but don’t let the intensity of the interval drop. With a high cadence, you will train your body’s adaptation to high speed efforts. Recovery between intervals is easy spinning. Recovery time between SI is limited in order to build repeatability and recovery.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up:
    1. 5 min @ 60 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
  2. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  3. Sprints (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Hard: 30 sec @ 130 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1:30 @ 45 % of FTP
  4. Recovery: 5 min @ 45 % of FTP
  5. Speed Intervals (Repeat 8 times)
    1. Hard: 20 sec @ 150-200 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 40 sec @ 45 % of FTP
  6. Recovery: 5 min @ 40 % of FTP
  7. Speed Intervals (Repeat 8 times)
    1. Hard: 20 sec @ 150-200 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 40 sec @ 45 % of FTP
  8. Recovery: 5 min @ 40 % of FTP
  9. Speed Intervals (Repeat 8 times)
    1. Hard: 20 sec @ 150-200 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 40 sec @ 45 % of FTP
  10. Recovery: 5 min @ 40 % of FTP
  11. Cool Down: 10 min @ 60 % of FTP

Running: 1:00:00 with Fartlek (4-3-2-3-4), 2.5min RBI

Fartlek = Swedish word meaning “speed play”. In this workout, you will play around with your speed cycling through fast pace/easy pace. These fast intervals are for 4-3-2-3-4 minutes, with 2.5 min easy pace (think Endurance Run pace) in between. This will help you work on your foot turnover and speed in a different way from strides.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 3-5 RPE
  2. Fartlek (4, 3, 2, 3, 4)
    1. Hard: 4 min @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    3. Hard: 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
    4. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    5. Hard: 2 min @ 8-10 RPE
    6. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    7. Hard: 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
    8. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    9. Hard: 4 min @ 8-10 RPE
    10. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
  3. Cool Down: 16:30 @ 3-5 RPE

Friday, April 17, 2020

Cycling: FastPedal and Muscle Tension Intervals (1:15:00)

We are working on both ends of the cadence spectrum today: high and low, but both done at Tempo power. To learn more about Muscle Tension intervals and why you should do them, read this article. Workout details are below, but here are the cadence targets for each interval: FastPedals @ 105-120rpm, Muscle Tensions @ 55-65rpm.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  2. FastPedal (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Fast Pedal: 1 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  3. Recovery: 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  4. MuscleTension (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Muscle Tension @ 55-65rpm: 4 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 3 min @ 45-55 % of FTP
  5. FastPedal (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Fast Pedal: 1 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  6. Cool Down: 11 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: Strides and Endurance Run (1:00:00)

There is an extra 5 min of Strides at end of the warmup to help with leg speed. During the strides, pay attention to keeping a quick cadence (think of running on hot coals!), posture, and arm swing. After the Strides, settle into your comfortable Endurance pace (RPE 5-6). If doing this on flat road, the strides will have you going faster than what you are used to, so good practice with foot turnover! Pay close attention to your effort level on the Endurance portion of the workout- don’t let yourself drift into a faster pace.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Strides (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Strides: 45 sec @ 9 RPE
    2. Recover: 1 min @ 6 RPE
  3. Endurance Run: 36:15 @ 5-6 RPE

Thursday, April 16, 2020

Cycling: 3x12min Threshold Ramps (1:15:00)

Threshold Ramp work is designed to increase your sustainable power at threshold. When we ramp up, the goal is to engrain progressive pacing. The workout starts with FastPedals at 100-120rpms then gets into the main set. Cadence is your choice on the Threshold Ramps.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. FastPedal (Repeat 5 times)
    1. High Cadence: 1 min @ 80-90 % of FTP, 100-120 rpm
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 50-60 % of FTP, 80-90 rpm
  3. Recovery: 3 min @ 45-55 % of FTP
  4. Threshold Ramp (repeat 3 times)
    1. 5 min @ 90-95 % of FTP
    2. 5 min @ 95-100 % of FTP
    3. 1 min @ 100-105 % of FTP
    4. 1 min @ 105-110 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 4 min @ 45-55 % of FTP
  5. Cool Down: 4 min @ 60-70 % of FTP

Running: Tempo Run 3x8min (1:00:00)

Running at your lactate threshold helps your body to better use and process lactate so that you can run harder for longer.  Since your Tempo effort is at RPE 8-9, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the duration. At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals. Ease into your Tempo interval and it should feel like a 10K race pace- comfortably hard. Check in with yourself and do a talk test. You should be able to say 3-4 words (but not be reduced to only a 4-letter word!)

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Strides (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Strides: 20 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recover: 1 min @ 5-7 RPE
  3. Tempo Run (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Tempo effort: 8 min @ 8-9 RPE
    2. Recovery Effort: 4 min @ 4-5 RPE
  4. Cool Down: 7:20 @ 3-5 RPE

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

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Today’s Driveway Drill from coach @iamjoshwhitmore for the CTS Quarantine Project: How to Trackstand Skill Level: Beginner to Advanced Bike: You can do this on any bike! Why is this important? Tricks impress your friends and earn you money right? Just kidding. The original use of this was on the velodrome in match sprint races. Riders would “trackstand” to force the other rider in front for the sprint. These days, it’s great for micro-balance skill development on any bike. On the trail, it can help you stay on the bike if you stall-out in technical terrain. You can use it to reposition your body or momentum to tackle the next obstacle. How to do it: Big picture – With the wheel turned, use pedal pressure to slightly pedal forward or let the bike roll backwards. That allows the bike to move left/right and keep your balance. Drill 1: Tight Turns. I find it is easiest to turn towards your forward foot when trackstanding. 🎯 Put your dominate foot forward and make tight turns in that direction 🎯 Ratchet pedal to keep moving 🎯 Practice getting slower and tighter turns Drill 2: Front Wheel Prop 🎯 Approach a non-movable object like a poll or wall 🎯 Turn into the object and rest the front wheel against it 🎯 Balance and concentrate on keeping your weight on the front pedal, no brakes, to maintain front wheel pressure against the object. For Real: 🎯 Come to a stop with your front wheel pointed up a slight incline 🎯 Let go of the brakes, concentrate on pressure on the forward foot 🎯 You can either pedal slightly forward or release pressure on the forward pedal to roll backwards slightly 🎯 In this video, if I was falling to the right, I’d pedal forward a bit. If I was falling to the left, I’d release pressure and drift backwards a bit. Advanced options: 🎯 Sitting / standing 🎯 One hand / No hands 🎯 Flat ground or different inclines What are your favorite drills to learn to trackstand? #mtbskillswithjosh #ctsquarantineproject ⁣#mtbskills #techtips #coachlife #mountainbike #ctsathlete #certifiedinstructor #pmbia #seekqualifiedinstruction #mtbskillscoaching

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Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Cycling: Front Loaded Threshold Intervals

Following a good warmup with two ramps and a few SpeedIntervals, you’ll start the main set of this workout. If you are doing them on a smart trainer in erg mode, each of the four threshold intervals starts with a ramp. If you are doing the workout on a standard trainer or outdoors, you don’t have to go through the trouble of remembering the ramps. Just roll into the opening PowerInterval intensity by building up over about 30 seconds, rather than starting the interval from a stop or a slow roll. Each interval starts with a 30-second max effort (RPE 10/10), then drops down to 100% of FTP for 90 seconds, and then to 95% of FTP for another 5 minutes. These intervals are front loaded with high intensity to generate a lot of lactate so you develop the ability to continue riding at a high power output while processing lactate back into normal aerobic metabolism.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up:
    1. 5 min @ 55-65 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. SpeedInterval Opener
    1. 30 sec @ 115-125 % of FTP
    2. Easy 1:30 @ 40-50 % of FTP
  3. Recovery: 2 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  4. Ramp up over three minutes
  5. Front Loaded Threshold Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Power Interval: 30 sec @ 145-155 % of FTP
    2. Climbing Repeat: 1:30 @ 100-110 % of FTP
    3. Steady State: 5 min @ 95-105 % of FTP
    4. Recovery: 3 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  6. Cool Down: 8 min @ 55-70 % of FTP

Running: 5 x 3 minute Running Intervals

Your VO2max represents the maximum volume of oxygen that your body can take in and use in an all-out effort. Even though these Running Intervals are at done at an RPE of 10, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the full 3 minutes. At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals. Best to do these on a hill (to help you maintain a consistent effort) Pace isn’t the goal here- it is the intensity that is the goal!

If you have to do this on a treadmill, you might be reach the intensity best at a 2% incline. Check in with yourself and do a talk test. Your breathing will be short and fast, with the ability to only say a short word before you need to take the next breath.

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Strides (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Hard: 20 sec @ 9-10 RPE
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 5-7 RPE
  3. Running Intervals (repeat 5 times)
    1. Hard Interval: 3 min @ 10 RPE (Accelerate over 15-20 sec to the pace you can sustain for the interval.)
    2. Recovery Interval: 3 min @ 4 RPE
  4. Cool Down: 13:20 @ 5 RPE

Monday, April 13, 2020

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Cycling: 5 x 5 minute Max Effort Stepdowns Intervals (1:15:00)

Following a good warmup, Max Effort Stepdowns are done from a standing start position. Sprint from a stop for 20-30s, then drop the intensity for each step in succession. These efforts are similar to fast starts in cyclocross, mountain bike races, and some criteriums. The key to success in those circumstances is the ability to start hard and notch your intensity back in steps instead of going out so hard you blow up and go backwards.

Each of the 5 stepsdowns goes like this:
30s @ MAX
60s @ PI power
1min @ CR Power
2.5min @ SS power
Recover and repeat!

Spin easy afterwards with easy EM and a proper cool down.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 5 min @ 60 % of FTP
  2. Ramp up in 3 steps
    1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
    2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
    3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
  3. Warmup: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  4. Ramp up in 3 steps
    1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
    2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
    3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
  5. Warmup: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  6. SpeedIntervals (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Hard: 30 sec @ 130 % of FTP
    2. Easy: 1:30 @ 45 % of FTP
  7. Recovery: 3 min @ 45 % of FTP
  8. Max Effort Stepdowns (Repeat 5 Times)
    1. Standing Start: MAX 30 sec @ 150 % of FTP
    2. PowerInterval: 1 min @ 135 % of FTP
    3. Climbing Repeat: 1 min @ 108 % of FTP
    4. Steady State: 2:30 @ 96 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 4 min @ 55 % of FTP
  9. Cool Down: 10 min @ 40 % of FTP

Running: Speed Play 8 x 1min TempoRun (1:00:00)

Just what it says in the title… today you play around with speed. After your warmup, you will cycle through some hard intervals at the upper end of your threshold pace. These are not VO2 intervals! If you try doing these at an RPE 10, you will fade out quickly. You have extra time to recover between so the intervals so that you can put in a consistent effort with each one. RPE of 9 is at the upper end of a 10K race pace, but it’s not your maxed out pace.

  1. Warm up: 20 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Speed Play Intervals (Repeat 8 times)
    1. Hard: 1 min @ 9 RPE
    2. Easy: 2 min @ 3-5 RPE
  3. Cool Down: 16 min @ 3-5 RPE

Friday, April 10, 2020

Cycling: FastPedal Intervals and High Cadence Endurance (1:15:00)

Warm up with 10-15min EM spinning, then head into the first set of fast pedals, aiming for as high of cadence as you can at or below Tempo power without bouncing in the saddle. Recovery between, then spin the legs out before the main set of High Cadence EnduranceMiles. The goal here is to try and spin around 95-105rpms at moderate power, working on leg speed and moderate effort. Finally, finish with a final set of fast pedals, cool down and done.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 55-65 % of FTP
  2. FastPedal (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Fast Pedal @ Tempo Power
      1 min @ 84-92 % of FTP
      100-110 rpm
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  3. Recovery: 3 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  4. High Cadence EnduranceMiles (Repeat 3 times)
    1. 6 min @ 70-80 % of FTP
      95-105 rpm
    2. Easy EM: 4 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
      80-90 rpm
  5. FastPedal @ Tempo Power (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 1 min @ 84-92 % of FTP
      100-110 rpm
    2. Easy: 1 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
  6. Cool Down: 7 min @ 35-45 % of FTP

Running: Endurance Run and Plyometric Drills (1:00:00)

Plyometric drills help your body learn to recruit muscle fibers more efficiently.

There are 2 running drills at the end of the warm up:

  1. Skipping- almost like what you did a a kid. Skip forward, bringing knees up to waist height, arms move with the opposing legs, just like they would while running.
  2. Lateral hops – hop at a 45 degree angle to the left, then to the right, repeat. Keep your arms moving naturally and land lightly on your feet.

After the drills, settle into your comfortable Endurance pace (RPE 5-6).

For the drills, keep upper body relaxed (and breathe!). Pay close attention to your effort level on the Endurance portion of the workout- don’t let yourself drift into a faster pace.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Skipping (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 30 sec @ 5-6 RPE
    2. Easy Run: 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
  3. Lateral hops (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 30 sec @ 5-6 RPE
    2. Easy Run: 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
  4. Endurance Run: 35 min @ 5-6 RPE

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Cycling: 3x10min SteadyState Intervals (1:16:00 total time)

SteadyState Intervals are a cornerstone workout for developing power at threshold. For a complete explanation about these crucial intervals, read this article.

Download Files: Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 60 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. SteadyState Intervals (Repeat 3 times)
    1. Interval: 10 min @ 96 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 5 min @ 45 % of FTP
  3. Cool Down: 10 min @ 55 % of FTP

Running: 4x4min TempoRun Intervals

Running at your lactate threshold helps your body to better use and process lactate so that you can run harder for longer. At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals. Ease into your Tempo interval and it should feel like a 10K race pace- comfortably hard. Since your Tempo effort is at RPE 8-9, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the duration. Check in with yourself and do a talk test. You should be able to say 3-4 words (but not be reduced to only a 4-letter word!)

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Strides (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Stride: 20 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recover: 1 min @ 5-7 RPE
  1. TempoRun Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. Tempo effort: 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
    2. Recovery Effort: 2 min @ 4-5 RPE
  2. Cool Down: 19:20 @ 3-5 RPE

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Today in the CTS Quarantine Project we have another Driveway Skills lesson from Coach Josh Whitmore.

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April 2nd Driveway Drill for the CTS Quarantine Project: Front and Rear Wheel Lifts (while coasting standing up). ⁣ ⁣ Skill Level: Beginner to Intermediate ⁣ ⁣ Bike: Best on a mountain bike but can also be done on a cyclocross bike or gravel bike. ⁣ ⁣ Why is this important? Often, we need to lift the front and/or rear wheel while we are coasting, standing up, when when facing obstacles in our path. This is also a critical building block for more advanced skills like doing a manual, jumping, or bunny-hopping. ⁣ ⁣ How to do it: ⁣ All of these start with a “neutral” body position. Neutral = Stand up with pedals level to the ground, chin over stem, and slight bend in elbows and knees. ⁣ ⁣ 1. Front Wheel Lift: Think – Neutral, Compress, Explode. Try this with no obstacle first. Just focus on the front wheel only, let the rear wheel just roll over the obstacle. ⁣ 🎯 Start in the Neutral body position⁣ 🎯 Compress the front suspension with a quick drop of your shoulders and punch down through your hands. ⁣ 🎯 Explode the front wheel up by raising your shoulders and pulling with your hands, using the return spring of the suspension to aid with the lift. ⁣ ⁣ 2. Rear Wheel Lift: Think – Neutral, Compress through your legs, then Scoop your feet. Try this with no obstacle first. Just focus on the rear wheel, let the front wheel roll over the obstacle and just lift the rear. ⁣ 🎯 Neutral body position.⁣ 🎯 Compress by dropping your hips and pushing through your feet. ⁣ 🎯 Scoop your feet, toes pointed slightly down time the lift to use the return spring of the suspension to aid you. ⁣ 🎯 You may also need to lunge the bike forward while the rear wheel is in the air. Push forward on the bars. ⁣ ⁣ 3. Front then Rear: Do them in order over the same obstacle. ⁣ 🎯 When the front wheel lands after the front wheel lift, that’s when you compress for the rear wheel lift. Tricky to get the timing right, practice! ⁣ ⁣ 4. Tap-Hop: For more advanced practice, use a taller object and tap each wheel on top of it. Timing of compression for the rear wheel lift is when the front wheel taps the top. ⁣ ⁣ #mtbskills #techtips #coachlife #mountainbike #mtbskillswithjosh #ctsquarantineproject

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Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Cycling: 6x2min PowerIntervals with Openers (1:15:00)

Power intervals are maximal efforts that should be performed at a 10/10 on the RPE scale. The goal of power intervals is to increase your maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) and subsequently raise your ceiling of performance to allow for more growth as far as your sustainable power at lactate threshold. Power intervals should be approached in a “peak and fade” style. This means you attack at the beginning of the interval; accelerate hard to get to maximum effort/power/pace as quickly as you can. Because of the intensity of this acceleration, you will almost certainly slow down and/or see a decline in power output from about 30 seconds in all the way to the end of the interval. You generate a tremendous amount of lactate with your initial acceleration, and you’re riding through that lactate accumulation for the rest of the interval as your aerobic system tries to “catch up”. Keep your cadence above 100rpm for the entire 2-minute interval. Recovery between intervals is purposely short, just three minutes. You’ll start the next interval before you feel fully recovered, especially toward the end of the set.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warm up:
    1. 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 60 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. 2 min @ 60 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 70 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 85 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 95 % of FTP
    5. 3 min @ 60 % of FTP
  2. Openers (Repeat 3 times)
      1. 30 sec @ 130 % of FTP
      2. Easy: 2 min @ 55 % of FTP
  3. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  4. PowerIntervals (Repeat 6 times
    1. PI: 2 min @ 125 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 2 min @ 45 % of FTP
  5. Endurance Miles: 15 min @ 75 % of FTP
  6. Cool Down: 9:30 @ 40 % of FTP

Running: EKG Workout (1:00:00)

The EKG Workout is designed to cycle through intervals at your endurance, tempo and running interval (VO2max) intensities. You have been doing a variety of workouts at different effort levels. This one will help you to feel the differences between what is comfortable, moderate, and hard.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 3-5 RPE
  2. Comfortable (Endurance effort): 3 min @ 5-6 RPE
  3. Moderate (Tempo effort): 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
  4. Hard (VO2 effort): 1 min @ 10 RPE
  5. Moderate (Tempo effort): 4 min @ 8-9 RPE
  6. Hard (VO2 effort): 1 min @ 10 RPE
  7. Recovery: 3 min @ 3-5 RPE
  8. Comfortable (Endurance effort): 4 min @ 5-6 RPE
  9. Moderate (Tempo effort): 2 min @ 8-9 RPE
  10. Hard (VO2 effort): 30 sec @ 10 RPE
  11. Moderate (Tempo effort): 2 min @ 8-9 RPE
  12. Recovery/Cool Down: 20:30 @ 3-5 RPE

Monday, April 6, 2020

Strength Training

Monday is going to be an upper body and core strength day! Pushups and Planks for the most part, with Russian Twists thrown in for some rotation work.

***SET #1***

  • 10 push-ups (1 minute break)
  • Complete with no rest between planks
    -30 second side plank (Left side)
    -30 second side plank (Right side)
    -30 second traditional plank
    (3 minute rest)
  • 15 push-ups (1 minute rest)
  • 1 minute of Russian Twists
    -Can hold weight in hands if available
    (2 minute rest)

***SET #2***

  • 10 push-ups (1 minute break)
  • Complete with no rest between planks
    -30 second side plank (Left side)
    -30 second side plank (Right side)
    -30 second traditional plank
    (3 minute rest)
  • 15 push-ups (1 minute rest)
  • 1 minute of Russian Twists
    -Can hold weight in hands if available
    (5 minute rest)

***SET #3***

  • 10 push-ups (1 minute break)
  • Complete with no rest between planks
    -30 second side plank (Left side)
    -30 second side plank (Right side)
    -30 second traditional plank
    (3 minute rest)
  • 15 push-ups (2 minute rest)
  • Russian Twists
    -Complete until failure

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Cycling: Tempo Mix #2 1:15:00

Here’s a mix of lower tempo/upper EM and SteadyState intervals with changes in cadence along the way. Designed for an upper aerobic workout, but not overly challenging. These are great for simulating rolling terrain or undulating climbs.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up:
    1. 5 min @ 45 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 4 steps
      1. EM: 2 min @ 60 % of FTP
      2. EM: 2 min @ 70 % of FTP
      3. Tempo: 2 min @ 80 % of FTP
      4. SS: 1 min @ 90 % of FTP
  2. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  3. Low Tempo: 10 min @ 85 % of FTP, 70-75 rpm
  4. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  5. High Steady State: 5 min @ 94 % of FTP, 90-100 rpm
  6. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  7. Low Tempo: 10 min @ 85 % of FTP, 80-90 rpm
  8. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  9. High Steady State: 5 min @ 94 % of FTP, 90-100 rpm
  10. Recovery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  11. Low Tempo: 10 min @ 85 % of FTP, 80-90 rpm
  12. Recvoery: 3 min @ 55 % of FTP
  13. Cool Down: 5 min @ 45 % of FTP

Running: 1:30 Endurance Run, RPE 5-6

The Endurance effort is where ultrarunners will spend a lot of time- since this is your “all day” pace. RPE is 5-6, so your breathing should be comfortable. This might mean dialing down your speed to a power hike when going uphill. Aim to keep your intensity level stable.

After you’ve warmed up, keep your intensity level at an RPE of 5-6. RPE 5-6= rhythmic breathing, not laboured at any point. In a talk test, you could still have a comfortable conversation. This will feel slightly harder than your recovery run.

If you can only say 2-3 sentences, you are going too hard!


Saturday, April 4, 2020

Cycling: SpeedIntervals 3x10min @ :20/:40 (1:10:00 total time)

SpeedIntervals are a series of sharp efforts separated by short recovery periods. In essence, you’ll accelerate, spin down, and then accelerate again before you catch your breath or lose all the momentum from your previous acceleration. While you can jump out of the saddle to start the efforts, it is better to think about these as revving your cadence while seated.

Each 10-interval is a series of 20-second efforts with 40 seconds recovery between them. Normally, these are done at a high power output. This variation is a lower power output but should still be a strong acceleration in a lighter gear. Heart rate will climb during each 10-minute set, but heart rate response lags behind actual effort, heart rate data is valuable for analysis after the workout but is not a good guide for intensity during the workout.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warm up:
    1. 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 90 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 55 % of FTP
  2. SpeedIntervals (Repeat 10 times)
    1. :20 sec @ 100 % of FTP, 110+ rpm
    2. :40 sec @ 55 % of FTP, easy spinning
  3. Recovery: 5 min @ 40 % of FTP
  4. SpeedIntervals (Repeat 10 times)
    1. :20 sec @ 100 % of FTP, 110+ rpm
    2. :40 sec @ 55 % of FTP, easy spinning
  5. SpeedIntervals (Repeat 10 times)
    1. :20 sec @ 100 % of FTP, 110+ rpm
    2. :40 sec @ 55 % of FTP, easy spinning
  6. Cool Down: 9 min @ 50 % of FTP

Running: 1:00:00 with Fartlek (4-3-2-3-4), 2.5min RBI

Fartlek = Swedish word meaning “speed play”. In this workout, you will play around with your speed cycling through fast pace/easy pace. These fast intervals are for 4-3-2-3-4 minutes, with 2.5 min easy pace (think Endurance Run pace) in between. This will help you work on your foot turnover and speed in a different way from strides.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 3-5 RPE
  2. Fartlek (4, 3, 2, 3, 4)
    1. Hard: 4 min @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    3. Hard: 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
    4. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    5. Hard: 2 min @ 8-10 RPE
    6. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    7. Hard: 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
    8. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
    9. Hard: 4 min @ 8-10 RPE
    10. Easy: 2:30 @ 5-7 RPE
  3. Cool Down: 16:30 @ 3-5 RPE

 


Friday, April 3, 2020

Cycling: FastPedal and Endurance Rampup (00:55:00)

FastPedal intervals are a cadence drill designed to help you increase the range of cadences you find comfortable. There is no optimal cadence for everyone, but it is advantageous to have smooth pedal mechanics at a wider range of cadences. Though your heart rate and breathing rate will increase during the intervals, there’s no prescribed heart rate or power ranges. You just want you to shift into an easy gear and bring your cadence up to as fast as you can go without bouncing in the saddle. Focus on kicking over the top and pulling through the bottom of the pedal stroke, as this will help you stay smooth and help you keep you from bouncing.

Following the FastPedal intervals there is a gradual rampup at an endurance pace. Each stage is 5 minutes long and the last one gets you up to the top of your Tempo intensity range. Although this is still below your lactate threshold, it will be a challenge because of the gradually increasing power output.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up: 9 min @ 55 % of FTP
  1. FastPedal Intervals (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Fast Pedal: 1 min @ 90 % of FTP, 100-110 rpm
    2. Recovery: 2 min @ 60 % of FTP, 80-95 rpm
  2. EnduranceMiles to Tempo Ramp up in 5 steps
    1. EM 5 min @ 64 % of FTP, 85-95 rpm
    2. EM 5 min @ 68 % of FTP
    3. EM 5 min @ 80 % of FTP
    4. Tempo 5 min @ 83 % of FTP
    5. Tempo 5 min @ 90 % of FTP
  3. Cool Down: 6 min @ 40 % of FTP

 

Running: Endurance Run with Running Drills (01:00:00)

Within this one-hour run, there 2 running drills after your warm up:

  1. Butt kicks- to help with quad and hip flexor flexibility. Keep your cadence up to help with leg turnover.
  2. High knees- to help you pay attention to midfoot landing and hamstring flexibility. Pay attention to your cadence.

After the drills, settle into your comfortable Endurance pace (RPE 5-6). For the drills, keep upper body relaxed (and breathe!). Pay close attention to your effort level on the Endurance portion of the workout- don’t let yourself drift into a faster pace.

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. High Knees Drill (Repeat 5 times)
    1. High Knees: 30 sec @ 5-6 RPE
    2. Recovery 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
  3. Butt Kicks Drill (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Butt Kicks: 30 sec @ 5-6 RPE
    2. Recovery 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
  4. Endurance Run: 35 min @ 5-6 RPE

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Cycling: 3 x 12 min High Intensity OverUnders (3U, 1O)

OverUnder Intervals are a great way to develop the “agility” to handle changes in pace during hard, sustained efforts. Last week, there was an OverUnder Interval workout in the Quarantine Project with the “Under” intensity at SS range, and the “Over” intensity at CR range. This week’s version is a High Intensity OverUnder because the “Over” periods are at PowerInterval intensity (110-125% of FTP). The “Under” periods are less intense than last week. In this version, they are at Tempo intensity (80-85% of FTP). During the 12-minute interval you will alternate between these two intensity levels. The harder surges within the interval generate more lactate in your muscles, and then you force your body to process this lactate while you’re still riding at a relatively high intensity. This workout can be performed indoors on a trainer or outside on a flat road, rolling hills, or a sustained climb that’s relatively gradual (3 to 6 percent grade). It is difficult to accomplish this workout on a steep climb, because the pitch often makes it difficult to control your effort level. Your gearing should be moderate, and pedal cadence should be high (100 rpm or higher) if you’re riding on flat ground or small rollers. Pedal cadence should be above 85 rpm if you’re completing the intervals on a gradual climb.

To complete the interval, bring your intensity up to your Tempo range during the first 45 to 60 seconds. Maintain this heart rate intensity for the prescribed Under time and then increase your intensity to your Over intensity for the prescribed time. At the end of this Over time, return to your Under intensity range and continue riding at this level of effort until it’s once again time to return to your Over intensity. Continue alternating this way until the end of the interval. OverUnder Intervals always end with a period at Over intensity. This workout builds up high levels of lactic acid. Working in this way trains your body to dissipate and buffer lactate, also known as increasing your lactate tolerance. Recovery periods between intervals are typically about half the length of the work interval.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

  1. Warm up
    1. 3 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 85-95 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 85-95 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. PowerIntervals (Repeat 3 times)
    1. 30 sec @ 110-130% of FTP
    2. 1:30 @ 45% of FTP recovery
  3. OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 3 times)
    1. 12-minute OverUnder:
      1. Under: 3 min @ 80-85 % of FTP
        80-95 rpm
      2. Over: 1 min @ 110-125 % of FTP
        80-95 rpm
    2. Recovery between intervals: 4 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  4. Cool Down
    1. 8 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: 5 x 2 min Hill Repeats (45 minutes total time)

Hill repeats are great to building strength and speed, not to mention confidence on climbs. The intensity for the Hill Repeat is TempoRun (8-9 RPE) while running uphill.

Find a short hill that would take about 2 min to run up. (If on a treadmill, raise the incline to 3-5%). Run up for 2 minutes a Tempo effort (RPE 8-9).

Walk down 1 minute to recover. Repeat 5 times then cool down to finish in 45 min total.

RPE 8-9 means you will be breathing hard, but not gasping for air. (not as hard as the Running Intervals!) You should be able to say a short sentence. Check in with yourself!

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 4-5 RPE
  1. Hill Repeats (Repeat 5 times)
    1. Uphill: 2 min @ 8-9 RPE
    2. Downhill Recovery: 1 min @ 4-5 RPE
  2. Cool Down: 15 min @ 5-6 RPE

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Strength Training, All Sports

Today’s strength training workout is split into two halves. In the first half, the recovery time between exercises is 1 minute, and at the halfway point of the workout there’s a longer 5-10 minute rest period so you can attack the second half with more energy. In the second half, the rest between exercises also increases to two minutes. Some coaches limit rest between exercises in order to make a circuit into a cardiovascular challenge as well as a movement challenge. Because you are already an endurance athlete and most likely still training on the bike or on the run, you can take more time between strength exercises in order to complete more reps with greater quality. If you look at this workout and think you can do more, run through the whole thing twice. Just take another 5-10 minute rest before restarting from the top.

10 push-ups (1 minute recovery)
Traditional Plank 45 seconds (1 minute recovery)
10 squats  (1 minute recovery)
Side Plank: 30 seconds right side, 30 seconds left side (1 minute recovery)
20 squats (1 minute recovery)
20 push-ups

(Halfway point. 5-10 minutes recovery)

Traditional Plank 1 minute (2 minute recovery)
20 Squats (2 minute recovery)
20 push-ups (2 minute recovery)
Side Plank: 45 second right side, 45 seconds left side (2 minute recovery)
20 Burpees (Finish Strong!)

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Cycling: Descending Intervals (1:16:00)

Descending Intervals are a great workout for taking advantage of the benefits of short, high-intensity intervals. The premise here is that each effort should be as hard as you can maintain for the whole duration, and that the recovery period is only as long as the effort that preceded it. As the efforts and recovery periods get shorter, you should aim to achieve the same or perhaps even higher power outputs than in earlier, longer efforts. These are hard intervals, but they increase power at VO2max (maximum aerobic capacity), and lead to subsequent improvements in power at lactate threshold (max sustainable output) and mitochondrial density (more and bigger powerplants to burn carbohydrate and fat in your muscles). That’s a lot of bang for your buck.

Complete the following workout a maximum of twice a week, separated by at least one full day of less intense work. Recovery between intervals is 5 minutes of easy spinning. Each effort is as hard as you can go for the entire duration, cadence 90+rpm.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warmup
  2. Descending Interval Set (repeat 5 times)
    1. 1 min @115%-130% of FTP
    2. 1 min @30-50% of FTP for recovery
    3. 45 sec @115%-130% of FTP
    4. 45 sec @30-50% of FTP for recovery
    5. 30 sec @115%-130% of FTP
    6. 30 sec @30-50% of FTP for recovery
    7. 15 sec @115%-130% of FTP
    8. 5 minutes recovery between sets
  3. Cooldown

Running: VO2 max Run Intervals (4x3min, 3min recovery)

Your VO2max represents the maximum volume of oxygen that your body can take in and us in an all-out effort.

Even though these Running Intervals are at done at an RPE of 10, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the full 3 minutes.

At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals.

Best to do these on a hill (to help you you maintain a consistent effort).  Pace isn’t the goal here- it is the intensity that is the goal! If you have to do this on a treadmill, you might be reach the intensity best at a 2% incline.

Check in with yourself and do a talk test. Your breathing will be short and fast, with the ability to only say a short word before you need to take the next breath.

Instructions:

  1. Warmup: 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Strides (repeat 5 times)
    1. 20 sec @ 9-10 RPE
    2. 1 min Easy 5-7 RPE
  3. VO2 max Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. 3 min @ 10 RPE (Accelerate over 15-20 sec to the pace you can sustain for the interval.)
    2. 3 min Easy @ 4 RPE
  4. Cooldown: 14:20 @ 5 RPE

Monday, March 30, 2020

Today we have a skills drill for cyclists, from CTS Coach Josh Whitmore. Although he is performing this drill on a mountain bike, this drill is just as effective and applicable to road, gravel, and cyclocross riders.

For today’s CTS Quarantine Project, here is a drill for your driveway: Split 8s or Rock Dodge. .

Skill level: Beginner

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Josh Whitmore (@iamjoshwhitmore) on

Why is it important: When turning, your rear wheel doesn’t track the same path as your front wheel. This drill helps with awareness of BOTH wheels when turning.

How to do it: Start with one object. Make your front wheel go on one side of the object while your rear wheel passes on the other side. Once you can do that every time, move to two objects. When you can do two, make a long line of objects. This is harder than it looks!

Ok, your turn. I Let’s see you do it. Make a video, Tag Josh and use the hashtags #mtbskillswithjosh and #ctsquarantineproject.

Sunday, March 29, 2020

Cycling: Tempo Mix (1:15:00)

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Tempo is a moderately challenging aerobic intensity interval, meaning it is harder than your cruising endurance pace but not so hard you can’t speak in short sentences. The key to incorporating Tempo into your training is accumulating time-at-intensity. Because they are moderately challenging and below lactate threshold, Tempo intervals are often quite long. Sometimes these will be prescribed as an individual 30- or 45-minute interval. The time-at-intensity is broken into smaller intervals in this workout, with the longer (10-minute) intervals at the low end of the Tempo intensity range, and the shorter (5-minute) intervals at the high end of the Tempo range.

Instructions:

  1. Warm up: 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
    1. Ramp up in 4 steps
      1. EM: 2 min @ 55-65 % of FTP
      2. EM: 2 min @ 65-75 % of FTP
      3. Tempo: 2 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
      4. SS: 1 min @ 85-95 % of FTP
    2. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. Low Tempo
    1. 10 min @ 80-89 % of FTP and 70-75 rpm
  3. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  4. High Tempo
    1. 5 min @ 85-92 % of FTP and 90-100 rpm
  5. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  6. Low Tempo
    1. 10 min @ 80-89 % of FTP and 80-90 rpm
  7. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  8. High Tempo
    1. 5 min @ 85-92 % of FTP and 90-100 rpm
  9. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  10. Low Tempo
    1. 10 min @ 80-89 % of FTP and 90-100 rpm
  11. Recovery: 3 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  12. Cool Down: 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: EnduranceRun (1:30:00)

The Endurance effort is where ultrarunners will spend a lot of time- since this is your “all day” pace. RPE is 5-6, so your breathing should be comfortable. This might mean dialing down your speed to a power hike when going uphill. Aim to keep your intensity level stable.

After you’ve warmed up, keep your intensity level at an RPE of 5-6. RPE 5-6= rhythmic breathing, not labored at any point. In a talk test, you could still have a comfortable conversation. This will feel slightly harder than your recovery run.

If you can only say 2-3 sentences, you are going too hard!


Saturday, March 28, 2020

Cycling: Max Effort Stepdowns: 3x5min, 4min RBI (1:08:00)

Following a good warmup, Max Effort Stepdowns are done from a standing start position. Sprint from a stop for 20-30s, then drop the intensity for each step in succession. These efforts are similar to fast starts in cyclocross, mountain bike races, and some criteriums. The key to success in those circumstances is the ability to start hard and notch your intensity back in steps instead of going out so hard you blow up and go backwards.

File Downloads: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warmup
  2. Max Effort Stepdowns (repeat 3 times)
    1. 20-30s @ MAX
    2. 30-40s @ PI power
    3. 1min @ CR Power
    4. 5min @ SS power
  3. Recover 4 minutes between intervals
  4. Cooldown

Running: Fartlek Ladder (2, 3, 4, 3, 2min), 2:30min RBI (00:55:00)

Fartlek = Swedish word meaning “speed play”. In this workout, you will play around with your speed cycling through fast pace/easy pace. These fast intervals are for 2-3-4-3-2 minutes, with 2.5 min easy pace (think Endurance Run pace) in between. This will help you work on your foot turnover and speed in a different way from strides.  Check in with your breathing and effort level!

  1. Warm up: 15 min @ 3-5 RPE
  2. Fartlek 1: Hard, 2 min @ 8-10 RPE
  3. Easy, 2:30 @ 5-6 RPE
  4. Fartlek 2: Hard, 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
  5. Easy, 2:30 @ 5-6 RPE
  6. Fartlek 3: Hard, 4 min @ 8-10 RPE
  7. Easy, 2:30 @ 5-6 RPE
  8. Fartlek 4: Hard, 3 min @ 8-10 RPE
  9. Easy, 2:30 @ 5-6 RPE
  10. Fartlek 5: Hard, 2 min @ 8-10 RPE
  11. Easy, 2:30 @ 5-6 RPE
  12. Cool Down: 13:30 @ 3-5 RPE

Friday, March 27, 2020

Cycling: FastPedal Ladder Workout (1:15:00)

FastPedal intervals are a cadence drill designed to help you increase the range of cadences you find comfortable. There is no optimal cadence for everyone, but it is advantageous to have smooth pedal mechanics at a wider range of cadences. Though your heart rate and breathing rate will increase during the intervals, there’s no prescribed heart rate or power ranges. You just want you to shift into an easy gear and bring your cadence up to as fast as you can go without bouncing in the saddle. Focus on kicking over the top and pulling through the bottom of the pedal stroke, as this will help you stay smooth and help you keep you from bouncing.

Download Files: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:
After a good warm up, the workout is structured like this:
2x3min with 3min RBI
5x2min with 2min RBI
5x1min with 2min RBI
Cool Down, and done.

The sets above should be completed one after the other, meaning that the first 2-minute FastPedal interval should start immediately after the final 3-minute recovery from the previous set of 3-minute intervals.

Running: Endurance Run with Strides (1:00:00)

There is an extra 5 min of strides at end of the warmup to help with leg speed. During the strides, pay attention to keeping a quick cadence (think of running on hot coals!), posture, and arm swing.

After the strides, settle into your comfortable Endurance pace (RPE 5-6).

If doing this on flat road, the strides will have you going faster than what you are used to- so good practice with foot turnover! Pay close attention to your effort level on the Endurance portion of the workout- don’t let yourself drift into a faster pace.

  1. Warm up
    1. 15 min @ 5 RPE
  2. Strides (Repeat 5 times)
    1. 45 sec @ 9 RPE
    2. Recovery: 1 min @ 6 RPE
  3. Endurance Run
    1. 36:15 @ 5-6 RPE

Thursday, March 26, 2020

 

Cycling: 3x12min Overunders (20,1U)

OverUnder Intervals are a great way to develop the “agility” to handle changes in pace during hard, sustained efforts. The “Under” intensity is your SS range, and the “Over” intensity is your CR range, and during the 12-minute interval you will alternate between these two intensity levels. The harder surges within the interval generate more lactate in your muscles, and then you force your body to process this lactate while you’re still riding at a relatively high intensity. This workout can be performed indoors on a trainer or outside on a flat road, rolling hills, or a sustained climb that’s relatively gradual (3 to 6 percent grade). It is difficult to accomplish this workout on a steep climb, because the pitch often makes it difficult to control your effort level. Your gearing should be moderate, and pedal cadence should be high (100 rpm or higher) if you’re riding on flat ground or small rollers. Pedal cadence should be above 85 rpm if you’re completing the intervals on a gradual climb.

To complete the interval, bring your intensity up to your SS range during the first 45 to 60 seconds. Maintain this heart rate intensity for the prescribed Under time and then increase your intensity to your Over intensity for the prescribed time. At the end of this Over time, return to your Under intensity range and continue riding at this level of effort until it’s once again time to return to your Over intensity. Continue alternating this way until the end of the interval. OverUnder Intervals always end with a period at Over intensity. This workout builds up high levels of lactic acid. Working in this way trains your body to dissipate and buffer lactate, also known as increasing your lactate tolerance. Recovery periods between intervals are typically about half the length of the work interval. Note: A more advanced version of this interval would alternate between SS and PI intensities instead of SS and CR intensities.

File Downloads: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 85-95 % of FTP
    3. Recovery: 5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 75-85 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 85-95 % of FTP
    5. Recovery: 5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    1. 12-minute OverUnder:
      1. Under: 2 min @ 95-100 % of FTP
        80-95 rpm
      2. Over: 1 min @ 101-110 % of FTP
        80-95 rpm
    2. Recovery between intervals: 8 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  3. Cool Down
    1. 10 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: 5x3min TempoRun

Running at your lactate threshold helps your body to better use and process lactate so that you can run harder for longer. Since your TempoRun effort is at RPE 8-9, these are not all out sprints! Accelerate into the interval until you reach the correct effort level that you can hold for the duration. At the end of 10 min warm up, you will do a few strides to get your body prepared for the faster work required in the intervals. Ease into your Tempo interval and it should feel like a 10K race pace- comfortably hard. Check in with yourself and do a talk test. You should be able to say 3-4 words (but not be reduced to only a 4-letter word!)

Instructions

  1. Warm up: 10 min @ 3-4 RPE
  2. Strides
    1. Repeat 5 times: 20 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recover: 1 min @ 5-7 RPE
  3. TempoRun Intervals:
    1. Repeat 5 times: 3 min @ 8-9 RPE
    2. Recovery: 3 min @ 4-5 RPE
  4. Cool Down: 13:20 @ 3-5 RPE

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Strength Training: All Sports

With so many people working at home this week, we’re having to adjust to spending lots of time at desks, tables, and chairs that might not be as ergonomically comfortable as your office setup. There are lots of sore shoulders and necks out there. Today’s strength/stretching workout isn’t tough. It’s more a series of exercises designed to stimulate upper-body muscle activation and improve shoulder mobility.

10 push-ups
(1 minutes rest)

Single Arm Circles (clockwise)
-10 right arm
-10 left arm
(30 second rest after completing both arms)

Single Arm Circles (counter-clockwise)
-10 right arm
-10 left arm
(1 minute rest after completing both arms)

20 Shoulder Shrugs
(1 minute rest)

10 Push-ups
(2 minutes rest)

20 Shoulder Shrugs
(1 minute rest)

5 Neck Rolls (clockwise)
(30 second rest)

5 Neck Rolls (counter-clockwise)
(30 seconds rest)

10 Triangle Push-ups
-Get into the traditional push-up position. The only alteration is that you should place both hands together forming a triangle with your index fingers and thumbs.
(3-5 minute rest)

Single Arm Circles (clockwise)
-20 right arm
-20 left arm
(30 second rest after completing both arms)

Single Arm Circles (counter-clockwise)
-20 right arm
-20 left arm
(1 minute rest after completing both arms)

20 Shoulder Shrugs
(2 minute rest)

5 Neck Rolls (clockwise)
(30 second rest)

5 Neck Rolls (counter-clockwise)
(30 seconds rest)

Push-ups until failure
-This is the final movement of the workout. Complete as many push-ups as you can until you are unable to lift yourself off of the ground with proper form.


Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Choose a Cycling or Running workout below

Cycling: PowerIntervals 7x 3min (Total time: 1:13:00)

Power intervals are maximal efforts that should be performed at a 10/10 on the RPE scale. The goal of power intervals is to increase your maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) and subsequently raise your ceiling of performance to allow for more growth as far as your sustainable power at lactate threshold. Power intervals should be approached in a “peak and fade” style. This means you attack at the beginning of the interval; accelerate hard to get to maximum effort/power/pace as quickly as you can. Because of the intensity of this acceleration, you will almost certainly slow down and/or see a decline in power output from about 30 seconds in all the way to the end of the interval. You generate a tremendous amount of lactate with your initial acceleration, and you’re riding through that lactate accumulation for the rest of the interval as your aerobic system tries to “catch up”. Keep your cadence above 100rpm for the entire 3-minute interval. Recovery between intervals is purposely short, just three minutes. You’ll start the next interval before you feel fully recovered, especially toward the end of the set.

File Downloads: .zwo, .erg, .mrc, .fit

Instructions:

  1. Warm up
    1. 5 min @ 40-50 % of FTP
    2. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 95-105 % of FTP
    3. Recovery
      5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
    4. Ramp up in 3 steps
      1. 1:30 @ 65-75 % of FTP
      2. 1 min @ 80-90 % of FTP
      3. 30 sec @ 95-105 % of FTP
    5. Recovery
      5 min @ 50-60 % of FTP
  2. Power Intervals (Repeat 7 Times)
    1. Interval
      3 min @ 115-130 % of FTP
      95-110 rpm
    2. Recovery
      3 min @ 30-50 % of FTP
  3. Cool Down
    1. 10 min @ 40-50 % of FTP

Running: 30/20/10 x3 (Total time: 00:50:00)

After your warm up, you will cycle though intervals at easy, moderate, and hard efforts. Check in with your effort using Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) cues below. Pay attention to how you are breathing to make sure you are making a distinction between the different paces.

Easy: RPE 4. Recovery effort, comfortable breathing. You could tell a great story here.

Moderate: RPE 6-7. Endurance to high end aerobic effort, moderate to deep breathing. Comfortable to short conversation 2-3 sentences.

Hard: RPE: 8-10. Lactate threshold to VO2max effort, deep and labored/rapid breathing. Short sentences to short words.

Instructions:

  1. Warm up
    1. 20 min @ 4 RPE
  2. Interval Set
    1. Set 1 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    2. Recovery
      1. 2 min @ 4 RPE
    3. Set 2 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
    4. Recovery
      1. 2 min @ 4 RPE
    5. Set 3 – 3 Repeats
      1. Easy – 30 sec @ 4-5 RPE
      2. Moderate – 20 sec @ 6-7 RPE
      3. Hard – 10 sec @ 8-10 RPE
  3. Easy Pace
    1. 17 min @ 4-5 RPE

Monday, March 23, 2020

Sport: All

To start out, we’re going to reference a popular strength training article and workout from our library: 5 Great No-Equipment Strength Exercises for Cyclists, Triathletes, and Runners. Exercise instructions and videos are available in the article. Combine the exercises into a superset, moving straight from one exercise to the next. Take 1-2 minutes of rest between supersets and complete 3-4 times.

Bodyweight Squats: 20-25 repetitions
Divebomber Pushups: 10 repetitions
Single Leg Glute Bridge: 10 repetitions per leg
Reverse Snow Angels: 10 repetitions
Spider Plank: 10 repetitions


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Comments 18

  1. Pingback: Good News About Detraining: It's not as bad or as fast as you think - Jason Koop

  2. Bravo, Bravo, Bravo:) This is awesome, CTS is one terrific group of people. Really appreciate all especially the running guidance!

    1. Not sure of other methods, but I use trainerday.com. You can upload a .zwo file as a new workout, then link your TP account to push the workout into your calendar.

  3. Just want to say thank you to CTS for making your expertise available to me during this period. I appreciate it very much!

  4. Hi, I’m fairly sure that the tags allow download to smart trainer software such as Zwift, but how do you do that? Would appreciate some information that would allow me to use the workouts on Zwift.

    and THANK you for helping us stay fit!

    1. Post
      Author
  5. Re the question about SS and CR. These refer to CTS training zones they call Steady State and Climbing Repeats. CTS uses a naming system for power / HR ranges that are different to a lot of others but once you get used to them are equally meaningful. They are really the CTS “Zones”. There are a bunch of different systems for computing and allocating ranges to train in; these are theirs. They work. (and disclosure: yes, I am a CTS coached person and believe in their system).

    By the way, Chris and everybody, this is a really generous and inspiring project. Thank you

  6. Thank you so much, but:

    Thursday, March 26, 2020

    Cycling: 3x12min Overunders
    ——-
    OverUnder Intervals (Repeat 4 times)
    ——-
    Is 3 or 4 cycling intervals?

    1. I think SS is Sweet Spot, under threshold, CR is over threshold but I don’t know the meaning of the acronym

  7. You guys (and gals) are great! I love your time crunched cyclist book and your Strava training plans. Thanks for all your efforts and these free resources. BTW can any of the files above be imported into Tacx TTS?

  8. Many thanks, I know that many athletes are struggling with finding alternative activities as group training and early races are suspended.

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